Islamic Relief Worldwide’s leadership resigns en masse after calling Israelis “monkeys and pigs” and terrorists “heroes”

Heshmat _Khalifa

Less than four weeks since a director of United Kingdom-based largest Muslim charity resigned as his multiple antisemitic posts in Arabic on Facebook resurfaced in early July. Today, according to the British newspaper “The Times”, Islamic Relief Worldwide’s board of trustees resigned en masse after as a second director of the organization has a similar history of antisemitic hate speech.

Almoutaz Tayara, who was covering a key-role in the administration and supervision of the Birmingham-based charity along with his colleague Heshmat Khalifa, described Hamas militants as “heroes” and denounced Arab leaders for their “cowardice and allegiance to the foreigners,” referring to the United States and Britain. Heshmat Khalifa, his predecessor, called Israelis “the grandchildren of monkeys and pigs” and Egypt’s president “a pimp son of the Jews”.

Hamas is a Palestinian fundamentalist militant organization, backed by the international Muslim Brotherhood, another international terrorist organization playing under the political umbrella. According to The Times, the IRW immediately replaced the first disgraced trustee with a man who labeled terrorists “heroes” and described Israel as the Zionist enemy.

Facebook and Twitter posts by Heshmat Khalifa also glorified terrorist attacks on Israel. He also represented the former president of the United States, Barack Obama, in clothing decorated with the Jewish Star of David. Miguel Moratinos, High Representative for the Alliance of Civilizations at the United Nations, said to be horrified loathsome social media posts by Heshmat Khalifa.

The Spanish diplomat and diplomat condemned most strongly the hate speeches by IRW leadership, calling them toxic, racist pronouncements that are an affront to human dignity. Several countries already banned the charity for its suspected link with Hamas and other terrorist organizations. Following the management’s hateful conduct, the NGO faces increasing restrictions on its access to financial services relating to the global regulatory framework in place to prevent the financing of illicit activities, including terrorism.

IRW is working in contexts where proscribed armed groups are operating, such as Syria, Somalia, Afghanistan, and Gaza, or in countries subject to international sanctions, such as Myanmar. Receiving, moving, and storing money via the formal banking system has become more difficult for the charity as some banks have demanded ever-more detailed information about donors, recipients, partners, and beneficiaries. Almoutaz Tayara and Heshmat Khalifa, through their posts calling terrorist heroes, confirmed the risks of their suspicious activities in supporting extremist and jihadi movements.

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