Tunisia finally has a chance and is called Kais Saied

Kais_Saied

“I ask people to keep calm and not to give in to provocations. I don’t want to see even a single drop of blood.” Tunisian president Kais Saied said after seeing the leader of the powerful Ugtt union the day after, he decided to sack Prime Minister Hichem Mechichi and suspend parliamentary activity. The UGTT declared itself in favour of Saied’s decision, underlining that constitutional guarantee must accompany the exceptional measures.

Another extremely positive sign was the closure of Al-Jazeera, the channel paid for by Qatar, which spread countless fake news and hate speech to arouse the country further. The police also searched the al-Jazeera headquarters, probably looking for evidence and money received to carry out Islamist propaganda services.

The now-former prime minister Hichem Mechichi, torpedoed yesterday by the Tunisian president Kais Saied, has published a statement on his official Facebook page. He takes stock of his work and announces that he accepts the decisions taken by the head of state. “I will pass on my responsibilities to the person who will be appointed by the President of the Republic according to the traditions of the state, wishing the new government team success,” he says. “Long live Tunisia, always free and glory to its people,” concludes the statement.

Read | Tunisia gets rid of Islamists, Prime Minister Mechichi sacked and Parliament suspended

Ten years after the ouster of Ben Ali, Tunisia is a stone’s throw from the turning point to recover dignity and democracy stifled by Islamists. The country finally has a chance after the announcement by President Kais Saied, who torpedoed Prime Minister Hichem Mechichi and suspended parliament for 30 days.

Saied’s proclamation came Sunday night at the end of an emergency meeting with security officials after yet another day of protests and clashes in various cities, with demonstrators calling for an end to the current political system and the dissolution of parliament. In addition, the Tunisian president announced that he had temporarily assumed the government’s leadership until the appointment of the new premier and removed immunity from all members of the Assembly. In the evening, he also imposed a night curfew from 7 to 6 and prohibited the gatherings of more than three people until 27 August.

Immediately after Saied’s proclamation, thousands of jubilant citizens poured into the streets, honking their car horns in jubilation, demonstrating the widespread support enjoyed by the head of state, which then allowed himself a bath in the crowds of the central Avenue Bourguiba in the capital. Then, finally, to reach the Ministry of the Interior headquarter, at the head of which he has appointed a loyalist. Tunisia finally has a chance and is called Kais Saied.

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