Moroccans are protesting rising fuel and other prices due to inflation

Morocco

Morocco MoroccoThousands of Moroccans took to the streets around the country on Sunday to protest rising petrol and other basic commodity costs. The North African country is the latest in a string of countries where public outrage has erupted over rising global energy costs, which are contributing to the world’s highest inflation rates in decades.

The Moroccan protests take place on the 11th anniversary of the Feb. 20 movement, which was inspired by the Arab Spring pro-democracy movements that took place across the region in 2011. A demonstration took occurred outside the parliament building in Rabat, Morocco’s capital. Protesters held signs and yelled slogans against the government for failing to curb skyrocketing costs, causing more people to sink into poverty. Around the protest venue, a large number of police officers were stationed.

Smaller protests erupted in other cities, with demonstrators demanding that the government intervene promptly to boost the people’s buying power. Fouzi Lekjaa, the minister delegate in charge of the budget, said the government has taken a number of steps to relieve the burden on Moroccan households, but that they are “insufficient.” The administration attributed the rise in basic goods prices to a mix of worldwide post-pandemic economic recovery and international price increases in cereals and oil products.

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In addition, the country is suffering from the worst drought in decades. According to a statement from the royal palace, the national average rainfall for this rainy season is only 7.5 millimeters (3 inches), which is 64 percent less than a regular year. It claimed 10 billion dirhams ($1 billion) had been set aside to help the agriculture industry and the economy as a whole cope with the drought.

High energy costs and related inflation are causing financial stress for governments, corporations, and individuals all across the world. As farmers and retailers pass on their expenses to customers, many of whom are experiencing a cost-of-living crisis, countries are trying to manage high power bills and soaring food prices.

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