Erdogan offends Macron again

Macron

Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdogan continues to attack in an aggressive and offensive manner the French president Emmanuel Macron. On Friday, Erdogan argued that “Macron is a burden for France.” The Turkish leader, head of a country in deep economic crisis, affirms that “Macron and France are going through a very critical period. My hope is that France will get rid of the Macron trouble as soon as possible.”A criticism that many have summed up with the classic motto “the ox that says horned to the donkey.” Considering the continuous flight of foreign investors from Ankara and the Turkish lira at historic lows in the exchange rate with the dollar for months.

The Turkish “sultan” spoke after Friday prayers held in the church of Agia Sofia, transformed into a mosque, and which he again opened to Islamic worship. Relations between Turkey and France have been tense for some time.The two countries have opposing visions, allies, and interests in many crisis scenarios, from the eastern Mediterranean to Libya, from Syria to Nagorno-Karabakh. Erdogan is no stranger to offensive attacks on Macron, accusing him of being against Islam and Muslims. Erdogan has even exploited for propaganda reasons the beheading of a French professor who had shown Charlie Hebdo’s cartoons on Muhammad at school.

His media and those financed by the Muslim Brotherhood, of which he professes himself the new leader, have exploited the defense of the secular values of the Republique to instigate hate speech against Paris that quickly turned into bloody terrorist attacks in various European capitals.In some videos of the Turkish presidency, Erdogan is compared to Mohammed II, threatening several times to destroy Israel, naming himself the new conqueror who will revive the Islamic State, renamed the neo-Ottoman Empire. The sultan also launched a media campaign last month under the slogan “Boycott French Products,” which went unheard in most Arab countries, where the Brotherhood continues to play a destabilizing role. By inciting violence and rebellion against state institutions, taking advantage of feelings of repression due to COVID-19 restrictions.

Read more : The real reasons for Erdogan’s next visit to Azerbaijan

Yesterday the Turkish leader added that if France does not get rid of the French president, it will not be able to overcome the Yellow Vests protest movement against social injustice in the country. He then claimed that Paris lost its credibility as an intermediary for the Minsk group, which was created in the 1990s to encourage the peaceful resolution of the Nagorno-Karabakh conflict. France sided with Armenia in the war and Turkey with Azerbaijan. Erdogan’s comments came amid mutual accusations by both sides. Relations have become increasingly strained on many issues, including what Erdogan calls French Islamophobia, and energy disputes in the Eastern Mediterranean and Libya.

Ankara has reached several illegal agreements with the Tripoli-based Libyan government, which will have to be replaced shortly by a new executive to put an end to the lack of legitimacy. In this context, Erdogan has sent tens of thousands of Syrian mercenaries to Libya since the end of last year, including jihadists, inexperienced minors and criminals fleeing the Bashar al-Assad regime. He has come into control of numerous military bases in western and southern Libya, from which it constantly threatens Europe. In fact, through the control of local armed groups, the new Sultan could open the doors to millions of African migrants, as it has already happened repeatedly at the Greek border, where tension remains high.

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